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About Slow Food NYC

This year’s charitable partner of Choice Eats is Slow Food NYC, a non-profit organization. Slow Food NYC is the local chapter of a national association that is part of an international movement. Slow Food USA, with over 200 chapters in the USA, is dedicated to achieving a good, clean, and fair food system, where good means food that is real and culturally rooted, clean means food that is produced sustainably and humanely, and fair means that those who produce our food are treated fairly and that everyone has access to good, clean food.

To benefit our community’s food system today and in the future, Slow Food NYC supports good stewardship of our productive land and water resources and biodiversity, engages in educational outreach, works with children in schools and with community-based food producers, and advocates for the availability of good, clean food in our community, particularly to our children. Slow Food NYC identifies, promotes, and protects fruits, vegetables, grains, animal breeds, wild foods, and cooking traditions at risk of disappearing while advocating for providers of real food - farmers, fishers, artisans - who produce, distribute, prepare, and offer wholesome food. Slow Food NYC is dedicated to the enjoyment of local and seasonal food and to celebrating real food as a cornerstone of pleasure, culture, and community.

Slow Food NYC will specifically emphasize their Harvest Time Program. This program of good food education is currently at four schools in New York City: one in East Harlem, one on The Lower East Side, and two in Williamsburg. The areas of Williamsburg and East Harlem where the schools lie have been designated by the Department of Health as being “food deserts”, with poor access to healthy food and high rates of obesity and diabetes. Slow Food NYC volunteers work with teachers, parents, kids, and members of these communities to educate them on good, nutritional food. The schools all have edible gardens run by students, and at one, kids sell the produce they grow back into the community.

Slow Food is looking to expand the Harvest Time Program in 2010 to two more schools, one in West Harlem, and another in Brooklyn. At the West Harlem school, students would run a farmstand, selling local produce acquired from Greenmarket farmers, to the community - similar to the program in East Harlem. The organizations is also working on what will be a community urban farm in Brownville, Brooklyn, an area also classified as a “food desert”.

A portion of the Choice Eats ticket sales will be donated to Slow Food NYC. The donation will be used to maintain and expand these important Harvest Time Programs.

For more information about Slow Food NYC, our programs, and our calendar of upcoming events, please visit www.SlowFoodNYC.org.